What To Do When Your Pelvic Floor Muscles Are Both Tight AND Weak

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Contrary to what we have been told in this culture, not all bladder leak issues are created equal.

Really.

When studies come out reporting that 30-80% of high school female athletes leak during their sport, it’s NOT because all of these young girls are too loose and just need to do a bunch of kegels.

There is usually a muscle imbalance going on where their muscles are actually too short and tight. And short and tight muscles don’t work well.

AND, at the heart of the issue is usually a disconnect between the brain and the pelvic floor muscles. Simply telling a person with spasmed pelvic floor muscles to relax is cute, but not helpful.

When I see this type of client (often, actually), the first step towards meeting their goal of NOT leaking urine with activities like jumping, running, or just sneezing, is to FIRST focus on helping them to be able to connect well with their breath, pelvic floor and core muscles.

This is where I jokingly call myself a pelvic health coach. These clients need feedback from an experienced clinician to guide them toward being able to connect with their muscles. A list of exercises will likely NOT yield the results we want.

Once good muscle coordination and connection is re-established, THEN we can work to resolve the tension and spasm through guided exercises in the office and at home.

THEN we can resolve any issues with weakness and help them to be able to coordinate their muscles well with the activities that they originally had leakage with.

It may take a few months to meet the goal, but once things are coordinated and healthy, we are good to go!

Just think... a few months of work now, you can resolve what could have been bladder issues for the REST OF YOUR LIFE.

Want to get started?

Download the Pelvic Tension Series FIRST, then consult with your local pelvic floor specialist physical therapist.

Have questions? I’d love to hear from you!